Whether location comes into your SEO strategy really depends on the nature of your startup. Airbnb certainly wants to be showing up in local results, and the likes of Uber, Skyscanner and Deliveroo all rely on location data to connect with users new and old. This is a crucial factor in terms of relevance for suitable searches and you may need to consider this if location plays a key role in your startup.

If you are going after a major metro, your site structure could be city+niche.com, with subdivisions/metro areas (upper east side, financial district, diamond district, bowery, harlem, etc) as categories. Then, the posts with city/town + keyword, putting LSI's in the H's, and a MAX of 8-13 LSI's in the tags section. You can make main menu pages about the subdivisions/metro areas and pull some unique stuff from Wikipedia and a few other spots with a nofollow citation, and link directly to the category pages, treating those pages as pillar posts.
The main point is that having a boilerplate template for content is better than spinning because you'll ensure it makes grammatical sense. Google doesn't need as much variation as people act like. I mean... they index tons of syndicated content with no changes at all. And the ad-libs (the act of inserting words or data into the content) adds real value.

I’ve always been a believer that hard work gets the best results, and in practice it always ends up being true. On the web it’s no different. If you want more organic traffic, you have to work for it. That means giving your best effort every time, going after opportunities your competitors have missed, being consistent, guest blogging strategically, and staying on Google’s good side.
I’m facing the imminent demise of WooThemes Canvas, looking at the daunting task of converting five sites over time. I’ve used PootlePress products with uniformly good results (and excellent support). But still, I’m having to review new sitebuilder/framework/pagebuilder possibilities for the switch with STABILITY as a very high priority. Given that the sites I manage are relatively straightforward and not huge, another high priority will be on simplicity, with no content lock-in. I just read a post with a horror story of what happens when you try to convert Divi pages which are heavily encoded in Divi’s own format. I’m guessing this will be very useful. Cost is also an issue, as I work for small nonprofits. I’m thinking the unlimited site pro option of Beaver or Tailor may look more attractive now than Pootle’s 18Tabs theme with PageBuilder which would cost $270/year for five sites. At any rate, thank you very much for doing a good bit of the homework for me.
If you go create an account cost you nothing to create one and why i think this is a cool tool for you it’s because I’ve been able to spit out really slick looking clickbait images for OTP phantom using this guy so if you’ll hang with me for just a minute i’ll show you how to make one really quick. It looks really good and you can plug it into any of your phantom campaigns. I’m not actually going to plug it into a phantom campaign I’m just gonna create an image so you can use your imagination on how to go from there.
With that in mind, this article is going to focus on some of my favorite machine­ based exercises and why I feel that they’re so valuable in one’s pursuit of building more muscle. I will not be naming any specific machines by brand but rather simply discussing various types of machines in general—most of which are common to any decently equipped commercial gym. 
Perhaps it’s naive, but my mindset with penalties has always been this: as long as I am doing things the right way, we’re fine. We weren’t doing any kind of gray or black-hat link building whatsoever and all of our links were coming naturally through creating great content and then showing it to people. This is exactly the behavior that Google wants to see and wants to reward–essentially, legit brand building. So, my assumption was always that we were 100% in the clear. But if you have any insight on that, I’d love to learn more.
I’m facing the imminent demise of WooThemes Canvas, looking at the daunting task of converting five sites over time. I’ve used PootlePress products with uniformly good results (and excellent support). But still, I’m having to review new sitebuilder/framework/pagebuilder possibilities for the switch with STABILITY as a very high priority. Given that the sites I manage are relatively straightforward and not huge, another high priority will be on simplicity, with no content lock-in. I just read a post with a horror story of what happens when you try to convert Divi pages which are heavily encoded in Divi’s own format. I’m guessing this will be very useful. Cost is also an issue, as I work for small nonprofits. I’m thinking the unlimited site pro option of Beaver or Tailor may look more attractive now than Pootle’s 18Tabs theme with PageBuilder which would cost $270/year for five sites. At any rate, thank you very much for doing a good bit of the homework for me.
Secure (https) to non-secure sites (http): Since Google began emphasizing the importance of having a secure site, more websites are securely hosted, as indicated by the “https” in their URLs. Per the security protocol, however, any traffic going from a secure site to a non-secure site will not pass referral information. For this issue, you can correct by updating your site to be secure through a third-party SSL certificate.
Tested the builder on the default Sample Page created by WordPress to get a quick feel for the overall interface and feature set of the plugin. This included using the builder to create a quick layout with several different elements to confirm the builder displayed properly in the default WordPress theme. As surprising as it might be, there are a huge number of plugins that display poorly in the default themes so this is always one of my first tests. If the plugin doesn’t work well in a default theme, how can we expect it to work well in other themes?
It is an overly broad generalization, but I’ve found that most developers that do not take the time to blend their own interfaces with the native WordPress interface, do not typically have great care for the overall user experience nor do they care greatly for WordPress itself. I cannot say if this holds true for the Visual Composer developers and, like I said, it is a very broad generalization, but it’s one I’ve found to be pretty accurate in my own experiences. It is one thing to strike out against standard user interfaces in order to create something better, and it is entirely something else to go drastically against style choices simply for the sake of it.

- Creating these networks is not free. It is not expensive, but it is not free. This software used to create your network is a minimum of $67/month. You’ll need hosting and that will cost you about $20/month. So bank on $87/month minimum to build your network. Plus, you’ll need domains. Lots of them. You can buy these at about $1 a piece and that will become a yearly cost.
Mobile traffic: In the Groupon experiment mentioned above, Groupon found that both browser and device matter in web analytics’ ability to track organic traffic. Although desktops using common browsers saw a smaller impact from the test (10-20 percent), mobile devices saw a 50 percent drop in direct traffic when the site was de-indexed. In short, as mobile users grow, we are likely to see direct traffic rise even more from organic search traffic.
It still works and can rank you fairly well for shorter long-tails if you want to take the time to juice them up. But if you aren't spamming them with links, it's soul sucking work that's not any fun. I quit doing it for that reason. Projects like this can work for people willing to churn and burn. It's not an easier way to make money these days, not like it was in the past. And I wasn't happy littering up the internet. This was me 10 years ago though when money was the only motive.

There is no better option to a flood of laser targeted organic traffic using low search volume longtail keywords that do not have many monthly searches but are super easy to rank for. This all would still take a lot of time to create all the content and pages, and it probably wouldn’t be worth it considering the amount of time spent on the building those pages.
As I have not the time to learn myself CSS in the deep (yes, I know this would be the best and I know it is easier then I will think) at the moment or to buy another theme to start from scratch, I decided to give “Elementor” a try – and from my first glance: Much faster and more user friendly as the other one. I decided for it because if the page builder breaks down, there will be still text to bridge the gap. From the performance perspective I can say it helped, but still: Page builder make pages slower. This is a fact. But I could afford to safe 7s after re-building with Elemntor and uninstalling the other one and now it is okay. I think it is because Elementor renounces of overloaded futures. But as I said, I am not knowledgeable and maybe I am wrong. 😉

In addition every single page has a local map included and also lists all the local areas closest to the area. In the back end there is area specific geo tragetting data, scema.org set up and loads more It really has been something ive developped over the last 5 years. The next upgrade coming next week I hope will also enable the user to put different phone numbers emails and addresses based in different locations so you can actually sell the calls based on location.
Amber Kemmis is the VP of Client Services at SmartBug Media. Having a psychology background in the marketing world has its perks, especially with inbound marketing. My past studies in human behavior and psychology have led me to strongly believe that traditional ad marketing only turns prospects away, and advertising spend never puts the right message in front of the right person at the right time. Thus, resulting in wasted marketing efforts and investment. I'm determined to help each and every one of our clients attract and retain new customers in a delightful and helpful way that leads to sustainable revenue growth. Read more articles by Amber Kemmis.

In order to edit the default content of the page, we’re required to install a separate plugin called SiteOrigin Widgets Bundle. What? Why? It appears that the plugin contains a series of widgets, which is fine, but seriously, site admins should not be required to install a second plugin just to edit the default content of the page, especially when all other aspects of the builder function without it.
The main point is that having a boilerplate template for content is better than spinning because you'll ensure it makes grammatical sense. Google doesn't need as much variation as people act like. I mean... they index tons of syndicated content with no changes at all. And the ad-libs (the act of inserting words or data into the content) adds real value.

If you want to know how engaging your content is, you might look at bounce rates, average time on page and the number of pages visited per session to get an idea – and Google can do precisely the same. If a user clicks through to your site, quickly returns to the results page and clicks on another listing (called “pogo-sticking”), it suggests you haven’t provided what this person is looking for.
For a long time, digital marketers summed up the properties of direct and organic traffic pretty similarly and simply. To most, organic traffic consists of visits from search engines, while direct traffic is made up of visits from people entering your company URL into their browser. This explanation, however, is too simplified and leaves most digital marketers short-handed when it comes to completely understanding and gaining insights from web traffic, especially organic and direct sources.
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